3 worst contracts on the Kansas City Chiefs 2023 roster

Brett Veach doesn't have many glaring contract mistakes right now, but there are a few problematic contracts nonetheless.

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Wide receiver Marquez Valdes-Scantling

I have already made my thoughts about wide receiver Marquez Valdes-Scantling known. I thought he could be a cap casualty this offseason, being cut to keep JuJu Smith-Schuster or acquire another top receiving option. But Smith-Schuster is gone, along with any other top receiving options, leaving Valdes-Scantling with a much more secure spot on the team. The 28-year-old had a decent season, catching 42 passes for 687 yards and two touchdowns. He had a huge showing in the AFC Championship game, catching six passes for 116 yards and a touchdown against the Cincinnati Bengals. But, looking at the stats at least, his production is not matching his pay.

Valdes-Scantling has an $11 million cap hit this season, a big jump from his $4.8 million cap hit last season. His 2023 cap hit ranks 23rd among NFL wide receivers, sandwiched between the Washington Commanders' Terry McLaurin and the Bengals' Tyler Boyd. If I could pick one out of those three, I would not pick Valdes-Scantling first. 

The wide receiver market is getting richer and richer every year, it seems. Valdes-Scnatling's cap hit ranking in 2024 reflects that. Despite his cap hit rising to $14 million, that actually ranks 23rd in the NFL. Maybe that is just the price of a team's top receiver nowadays. But, the Chiefs are paying that to Valdes-Scantling and not a bona fide WR1.

The Chiefs' wide receiver room lacks a clear top option, but MVS is the clear veteran among the group. That is the value he likely brings to the room—some veteran mentoring and dependability with Mahomes. That is still a hefty price tag for those two qualities if you ask me. Spotrac says the Chiefs missed their best chance to get out of his contract. If they were to release him after the 2023 season, he would incur a dead cap hit of $2 million while saving the team $12 million. That is not a bad outcome if it comes to that. 

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