Cornerback considered Chiefs biggest remaining weak spot

Dec 18, 2016; Kansas City, MO, USA; Kansas City Chiefs defensive back Terrance Mitchell (39) breaks up a pass intended for Tennessee Titans wide receiver Rishard Matthews (18) during the second half at Arrowhead Stadium. The Titans won 19-17. Mandatory Credit: Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports
Dec 18, 2016; Kansas City, MO, USA; Kansas City Chiefs defensive back Terrance Mitchell (39) breaks up a pass intended for Tennessee Titans wide receiver Rishard Matthews (18) during the second half at Arrowhead Stadium. The Titans won 19-17. Mandatory Credit: Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports /
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Gregg Rosenthal of NFL.com believes that the Chiefs are largely set but questions the talent across from Marcus Peters.

The latest columns from Gregg Rosenthal at NFL.com takes a closer look at both conferences and the biggest remaining weak spots for every team in the AFC and NFC. For the Kansas City Chiefs, Rosenthal makes it clear that he believes K.C. is a deep and talented team, so the term weak spot is a relative one. However, he does point out cornerback as a potential area of concern. He writes:

"GM John Dorsey has built a roster that reflects the Chiefs’ head coach (Andy Reid) and quarterback (Alex Smith). After four full seasons with Dorsey in the position, there are few spots on this roster that are true problems. Even the less flashy spots (inside linebacker, running back and offensive line) perform at a professional level. Dorsey’s biggest concern could be with his cornerback depth chart. The draft didn’t bring any help to a group that was giving Steven Nelson, Terrance Mitchell and Phillip Gaines snaps behind star Marcus Peters. It’s not close to the worst group in the league, but as with the rest of the Chiefs’ roster, the question is, is it good enough to take the next step in January?"

As for what we think of Rosenthal’s take, it’s actually nice to read someone who has proven to be decently familiar with the team’s overall depth. Because of that, it’s hard to argue with him. Peters is an elite asset, a lockdown corner that any team would love to have atop the depth chart. Across from him has proven to be a difficult slot to fill, but it’s certainly not without the candidates.

Nelson played well in the nickel slot last year and it was his real first year after a redshirt season of sorts during his rookie campaign. It wouldn’t surprise anyone to see him really start to stand out in his third year, even if he remains No. 3 on the depth chart here and stays inside. Gaines has as much talent and athleticism as anyone, but injuries and inconsistent play have kept him from making this entire conversation moot.

Mitchell is another name to throw in the mix here and he certainly looked the part down the stretch, but it’s hard to tell whether or not he could hold up for 16 games in that same role, knowing that teams will now have significant film to study to know how to try to force him to adjust. Is he another Marcus Cooper or a great story as a player released many times, even by the Chiefs, who has finally found his place in the NFL?

At the very least, all three are young, ascendant players who should get better with competition. The cupboard is also certainly not bare behind all of these guys as well, with D.J. White, Kenneth Acker and a number of other rookies, drafted and not, and recently signed players. There’s not a single position with more competition for every slot top to bottom after Peters, and it will be interesting to see how training camp shakes all of this out.