Chiefs: Could luck go from good to bad

Jun 14, 2016; Kansas City, MO, USA; Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith (11) speaks to media before the mini camp at University of Kansas Hospital Training Complex. Mandatory Credit: Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports
Jun 14, 2016; Kansas City, MO, USA; Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith (11) speaks to media before the mini camp at University of Kansas Hospital Training Complex. Mandatory Credit: Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports /
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In the last installment of why the Chiefs upcoming season could fall short of expectations, we will, briefly, discuss the luck factor. And no, not the newly paid Andrew Luck, but the ball bouncing your way luck.

In the 2015 season, at the end, the Chiefs were fortunate to escape with some of the wins they did. Both San Diego and Cleveland were able to get the ball into Chiefs territory (San Diego had time to take multiple shots at the end zone); Cleveland was driving when the clock ran out, while Buffalo and Oakland both had the ball when the game ended in their attempts to drive for a win. Pittsburgh, on their third string quarterback, went back and forth with the Chiefs the entire game until the Chiefs were able to put the game away late.

What happens if the ball doesn’t bounce their way this season. Indication of what I mean is certainly visible in the Jamal Charles fumble at the end of the Denver game. While the Chiefs clearly outplayed the Broncos in the first half, turnovers as well as a fumble on a really dumb play led to the Chiefs defeat.

While it certainly isn’t something one can count on, and one must view a season completely independent , Chiefs fans have come to realize just how big a single turnover can be (let me take you to the Arizona game for the Travis Kelce ‘fumble’)

A couple bounces one way or another, and the Chiefs season could take on a different look. An interception turns into an incomplete pass on defense or vice versa with the offense could have a subtle but significant impact on the upcoming season.

On a different topic, with the contract extension announced for Colts QB Andrew Luck, one has to wonder why any parent would allow their child to play football. The money in basketball and baseball is so much greater, both in true and guaranteed dollars, and the concerns of one’s brain turning to mush are far less in baseball and basketball then they are in football. My first reaction when I saw Luck’s extension was simply ‘That’s It?’

It also paints the issues with paying quarterbacks , and namely the Chiefs situation. If you don’t pay monster money to a quarterback , you get stuck with the Matt Cassel’s of the world…wait, never mind. It is a great indicator of why teams should be drafting QB’s almost on a yearly basis, to ensure they always have even quasi-competent quarterback play. Without the young quarterback option, teams sometimes are forced to over pay to ensure quasi competent quarterback.