In 48 hours, this will all be over — mock draft season, I mean. You'll be safe fr..."/> In 48 hours, this will all be over — mock draft season, I mean. You'll be safe fr..."/> In 48 hours, this will all be over — mock draft season, I mean. You'll be safe fr..."/>

Reach’s mock draft for the Kansas City Chiefs, Version 2.0 (pure BPA)

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Round 2: Pick 49 | Devin Funchess, WR, Michigan

The Funchess selection is the first indication that a wooden application of the BPA method can be dangerous. Put simply, he’s a bad fit for head coach Andy Reid’s west coast offense. He plays slower than his 40-time would indicate, labors in and out of breaks, and has suspect hands. Those characteristics make him a square peg to this offensive system’s round hole. Look carefully at the prospects rated beneath Funchess. Nelson Agholor would be a much better pick for the Kansas City Chiefs in the second round and as the fifth-highest rated prospect on the board, he wouldn’t qualify as a “reach.”

Round 3: Pick 80 | Ameer Abdullah, RB, Nebraska

Mandatory Credit: Glenn Andrews-USA TODAY Sports

This is actually a solid pick for the Chiefs at this point in the draft. Abdullah’s a polished running back prospect who has a physical style that would round out the Kansas City backfield. There are concerns with Abdullah’s ability to secure the football (much like a younger Knile Davis), but he may have an advantage over Davis in the vision and decision-making departments. Full disclosure: guard Ali Marpet was in the area and I would’ve preferred him to Abdullah at 80th overall.

Round 3: Pick 98 | Hroniss Grasu, C, Oregon

Mandatory Credit: Scott Olmos-USA TODAY Sports

Grasu is the kind of lunch-pail center Reid swoons over. He has the tenacity and work ethic to be successful in the NFL, but he could stand to get a bit stronger. Grasu is athletic and has the kind of range that would make him an asset in Kansas City’s zone-blocking scheme. This is yet another pick I’d have no issue with, even this early in the draft. He is coming off of a leg injury that cost him playing time at Oregon in 2014, but most draft experts don’t expect it to have lasting effects on Grasu’s game in year one.

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