Higher salary cap could allow Chiefs an easier time to three-peat

The Chiefs might be able to keep more of the band together if they can match the finances of other teams.

Super Bowl LVIII - San Francisco 49ers v Kansas City Chiefs
Super Bowl LVIII - San Francisco 49ers v Kansas City Chiefs / Perry Knotts/GettyImages
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Going into an offseason, the hope for non-playoff teams is that some of them have something that contenders do/will not: money to burn. In the wake of a Super Bowl win or even a deep postseason run, it's common for those teams most stacked with talent to lose an important player or three the following spring to those teams who can best afford to reward a free agent (and likely reset the market in the process).n

This offseason, the Chiefs are due to lose multiple parts that helped make up a cohesive whole, especially on defense, that took home the team's second consecutive Super Bowl win. From future Hall of Fame defensive tackle Chris Jones to lockdown corner L'Jarius Sneednsdan, the Chiefs were ready to potentially lose both quality and quantity.

But those losses might be curbed if the new salary cap has anything to say about it.

The Chiefs might be able to keep more of the band together if they can match the finances of other teams.

The league announced this year's salary cap at $255 million or a $30M jump from last season—giving the Chiefs and other teams who were more on the "strapped" side room to operate.

For example, the Chiefs were likely going to let someone like Mike Danna go, a quality performer at a key position who deserves a larger market than what K.C. was going to be able to likely offer with other bidders. Given the higher salary cap, the Chiefs might be able to squeeze more out this offseason after all and potentially bring him back to help handle the ACL injury to Charles Omenihu.

Even more, fans will be crossing their fingers that the extra space will allow the Chiefs to bring back big-ticket items like Jones and Sneed to anchor a defense that largely carried them to the Super Bowl. For a team looking to three-peat for the first time in NFL history, such playmakers could make the difference instead of having to lose one in a parity-centered process.

Of course, each team will also have the same amount to work with, so perhaps the market rates simply go that much higher and principles stay the same. However, if the Chiefs can keep the bidding close between themselves and lesser suitors, their sustained success could help put them over the top in FA negotiations.

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