Chiefs vs. Chargers: Why Kansas City’s defense will thrive in Week 2

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CINCINNATI, OHIO – SEPTEMBER 13: Quarterback Tyrod Taylor #5 of the Los Angeles Chargers looks to pass against the Cincinnati Bengals during the first half at Paul Brown Stadium on September 13, 2020 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

Tyrod Taylor is not dynamic

Tyrod Taylor has been fighting for respect his whole career. A journeyman backup, sometimes starter, he actually received some accolades during his days in Buffalo. His 2015 season was by far his best, one in which he amassed nearly 4,000 yards and totaled 24 touchdowns. Unfortunately for Chargers fans, 2015 was a long time ago.

I have a soft spot for quarterbacks like Taylor—players who clearly love the game and are great teammates, even though things don’t always go their way. That can only get you so far, and Taylor did not look great on Sunday.

Against the Bengals, The ball tended to sail on Taylor early in the game, and it proved out in the box score where he only completed 16 of his 30 passes. As mentioned before, this was against a less than talented secondary.

The big difference Taylor brings from the last decade-and-a-half of Chargers football is his mobility. He was able to elude some sacks thanks to his athleticism, and made a couple nice throws on the run.

The truth is, he’s no Lamar Jackson or even Russell Wilson for that matter. He’s not a bad quarterback, by any stretch, but he’s just not the type of guy who can score enough to keep up with the Chiefs offense.

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