Chiefs: Dabbling In Futures Commodities


1 Feature From The Bleachers

Fans have been clamoring for real depth on the Kansas City Chiefs roster for as long as I can recall. Enter General Manager John Dorsey and Head Coach Andy Reid. After one and a half years, their method of, “You Pluck em, I’ll Shuck em” has taken root and now the Chiefs find themselves standing in the midst of a teaming terrarium of talents.

Just 16 short months ago… or being one season removed from…  the Chiefs depth chart at QB was Matt Cassel as QB #1, Brady Quinn as QB #2, Kyle Orton as #3 and Tyler Palko as QB #4. Whew. I still smell the stench.

Now, the starter, Alex Smith is “in place” (notice I didn’t say “is solid” or make any other kind of compliment, so as not to set the very few detractors off on a rant)… and by having him in place, Andy Reid has been able to focus his high powered laser-beam of QB mysticism at Tyler Bray and newby Aaron Murray, like he’s done with others in the past.

And this QB-rags-to-riches story goes back further than you may know.

In his piece called, “Andy Reid: Philadelphia Eagles Coach Is an Absolute Quarterback Guru” Randy Jobst of Bleacher Report stated,

“Mike Holmgren, Favre’s former head coach in Green Bay, gets most of the credit for the development of Favre, as he should. However, Reid was still an instrumental part of his maturation as an elite quarterback. Reid was an offensive assistant for three years in Green Bay before he was promoted to offensive line coach in 1995. In 1997, Reid was switched to quarterbacks coach, where he helped guide Favre and the Pack to a second straight Super Bowl.”

That was in 2011, before Reid drafted and developed current Eagles rave, and QB of the future, Nick Foles.

Now, this ability to mold raw talent into starting excellence is spilling over to many positions on the team.

On Special teams, the Chiefs have just dumped their two starting returners. Obviously with the belief that the next man to step into that role will be just as good or better.  De’Anthony Thomas first comes to mind when focusing on the punting game. Knile Davis will likely get the first crack at kick-off returns and since he’s already had some time there could be an improvement over Quintin Demps who had a very good year with 33 returns for 30.1 yards per return. Davis had 10 returns for 32.1 yards per return.

~ ~ ~

“The future’s so bright, I’ve gotta wear shades.”

~ ~ ~

Take a look at almost any position. Two years ago the Chiefs had Brandon Carr and Brandon Flower at CB. Some will argue that Carr and Flower were better than what the Chiefs have now. However, can you even name the 3rd CB on the roster that year? Now, the Chiefs can line up with: Sean Smith, Marcus Cooper, Ron Parker, Phillip Gaines and Brandon Flowers too. Plus there are a number of other developmental corners on top of several DBs playing at Safety who can play CB and still cover well.

I’m not going to comment on the supposed new standard for Chiefs CBs to be bigger-faster-stronger-taller… and as least six feet… because, this is more about the fact that the Chiefs have three very good corners in Smith, Flowers and Cooper and two corners with every bit the look of quality corner’s to come, in Parker and Gaines.

Not only that, but I’m impressed with a couple of other CBs the Chiefs have in camp at the moment. Namely, DeMarcus Van Dyke with his 4.28 speed (he once ran a 4.22 handheld) on a tall 6-1 frame and Chris Owens with six years of NFL experience under his belt.

If the Denver Broncos ever try putting

10 WRs on the field at once I think

the Chiefs should have them covered.

Van Dyke also passes the smell test… I mean he just looks and plays fast. Take a look-see at some of his old college tries including combined footage with Mike Mayock comments from four dawg years ago:

It’s also good to know he’s gained 10 pounds since.

~ ~ ~

“I have a dream….”

~ ~ ~

Is it a dream come true or a nightmare in the making? I’m referring to the offensive line of course. After losing what were some of my favorite players in Branden Albert and Geoff Schwartz (as well as Jon Asamoah) I figured the Chiefs were either in for… a two year turnaround as far as a return to legitimacy goes… or a draft filled with more high round OL. However, neither appears to be the case and the dream of an awesome offensive line looks like a strong possibility sooner than later.

Why?

A couple of months ago I wrote about how good I believe Right Guard Rishaw Johnson can be in “Meet The Chiefs New Right Guard” in which I charted every play of the game with the Chargers in week 17. The surprise choices in round six of the draft now place the Right Guard position in question. Actually, that’s probably the “future” of the Right Guard position.

Looking back at the OL choices Andy Reid made in the 2013 offseason, it’s likely that the fewest number of changes will take place again this offseason. So, expect to  see the following offensive alignment on opening day:

LT- Eric Fisher (unless his shoulder isn’t ready by then)

LG- Jeff Allen

C – Rodney Hudson

RG- Rishaw Johnson

RT- Donald Stephenson

To understand the future of the Chiefs OL you must first know the present. You may say Rishaw Johnson has only had one game starting (week 17 v. the Bolts) but he’s had more time with the rest of the unit, in practice, than any other player available on the roster. So, who starts is not just about availability but about who is already known, in game situations, to be good. Yes, one game in not a large sample but, I beleive Reid will lean on that sample more than taking a risk on any other unproven talent he has in house now. Just like he waited last year to insert Geoff Schwartz (when many believed Schwartz was better than a couple of the starters).

Besides, this piece isn’t about arguing the merits of those who will be starters but those who will make up the future of the offensive line.

With those OL players in house now, the future appears dreamier than ever.

Mr. French Canadian Larry Duvernay-Tardif looks like he’s going to be an exceptional find and I’d be surprised if he’s not one of the first players off the bench when a starter goes down this year. Plus, he’s been known to have a mean disposition on the field that’s not usually associated with our passive French allies.

I’m also impressed with the Chiefs 6A draft pick, 6-5, 323 pound 22 year old Zach Fulton. I’m amazed at how GM John Dorsey and coach Reid can pluck seemingly diamonds from the dirt pile rounds of the draft. However, Fulton played every game of his college career at Right Guard and looks to have a future there with the Chiefs if he continues to progress. I have followed the draft long enough too, to know that a preseason ranking isn’t as important to the players being drafted as an April ranking is. That being said, in July of last year, Chris Low of ESPN wrote a piece called, “Ranking the SEC Offensive Linemen” in which he ranked Zach Fulton the 7th best SEC lineman. Not the 7th best “Guard” or the 7th best “Interior Linemen”… he said the 7th best (overall) linemen.

Low said of Fulton,

“Yep, another Tennessee offensive lineman on the list. Fulton hasn’t received the same notoriety as (Tiny) Richardson or (Ja’Wuan) James, but he’s a rock-solid 6-foot-4, 324-pound guard who has everything it takes to play a long time in the NFL.”

Take a look at this video interview with Zach Fulton and tell me if he looks like the “mans-man” that he looks like to me. He looks friendly off the field.. but wow, who would want to line up across from him?

So, how does a guy like Fulton fall to the 193rd pick? Well, we know this draft was loaded and Dorsey and associates are good at their jobs and I’ll leave it at that.

In any event, it looks like the future of the Chiefs offensive line is in good stead.

~ ~ ~

“You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one”

~ ~ ~

The turnaround of the Chiefs organization is still a work in progress. Many are predicting the Chiefs will take a step backwards this year based upon the “difficult” schedule the league has published. I don’t agree.

The Chiefs turnaround has happened because the whole organization has changed from top to bottom. That began when Clark Hunt decided that both the GM and the head Coach would report to him separately and individually. That one shift alone can create an empowerment of each employee that transforms the structure and consequently the process. Indeed the process HAS changed and I don’t see chinks in the armor like you could easily find in the Pioli era or the Peterson reign.

Now, the organization is being built from the bottom up instead of just the top down and that’s an important distinction. For that to happen, the players who will be stepping forward in the future to take their place on the front lines are at the ready and being trained for their moment.

A strong group of developmental players. A strong group of starters. A strong cadre of coaches. A strong general manager. A strong owner. What more could you want for your favorite team? It looks like the Chiefs are taking care of their future… today.

~ ~ ~

“The future depends on what you do today.”

~ ~ ~

What say you Addict fans? Are you ready to put on some shades? Or… do you think I’m just wearing rose colored glasses?

Tags: Kansas City Chiefs

  • berttheclock

    Excellent twenty twenty vision. No need to change your lenses.

    “I can see clearly now, the rain is gone, gonna be a bright, bright, sun shiny day”.

    • ladner morse

      Actually, I have an astigmatism in my left eye… recurring dyslexia… a little cataract build up in both………….. but other than that I can perfectly see the Chiefs future is as bright as ever.

      • berttheclock

        Ah, the problems of aging. Tomorrow, I have to begin insulin for my Type II problem. For almost 7 years, my sugar level was controlled by both Metformin and Glypezide. But, a few months ago, my sugar level kept increasing, while, my weight was rapidly dropping. So, my great doctors at the VA are starting me on insulin to correct this. If this were not so serious, I would highly recommend this for losing weight. But, going from 225 to 208 in less than two months is a bit extreme.

  • Hawthorne

    I agree for the moment, but 2016 will be the real test. With Charles, Cooper, Poe, DJ, Hali, Berry,Sean Smith, Jeff Allen and Donald Stephenson all up for resigning. We can probably only keep half (if that) of those players so we will need replacements. The Canadian could replace Stephenson, Allen thus far has looked eminently replaceable, but if he continues to look that way, we’ll probably keep him. Charles has to be resigned, as does Poe, no one could come close to their production. Probably will lose Hali, Sean Smith and either Berry or DJ. We already drafted Ford, and are pretty solid at CB but I don’t see anyone on the roster yet who could replace Berry or DJ.

    • berttheclock

      Well said, but, one of the reasons I am happy to see John Dorsey lead the way at GM is based on something Ted Thompson said about what he had learned from Ron Wolf. As Dorsey worked under both of them, I see a great deal of the same in Dorsey. Thompson said he learned to never stop scouting, whether from the college ranks, the NFL, the CFL or even his own team. Scouting and evaluating and never rest on one’s laurels. As you mention, it is tough for any NFL team including the Chiefs to keep their stars, so, finding replacements never ceases.

    • tm1946

      Hope you are wrong only because 2016 seems a long way off.

    • A1 Yola

      No one can replace Derrick Johnson! He makes the Pro Bowl Every year. Johnson won’t ask for a Kings Ransom, He’s not that type of guy.

      • berttheclock

        I remember sitting at D’s Bar in Portland watching games with a friend and we both kept saying Derrick Johnson was the glue in the defense. No one worked harder than he did.

        • A1 Yola

          And it shows in His play on the field. He’s been playing at a high level since coming in as a Rookie. He made everybody forget about someone named K. Mitchell!!

      • freshmeat62

        If there’s anyone that should be holding out for more money, it’s DJ.

      • Hawthorne

        I hope you are right, but as we have seen with Alex Smith, what a player wants and what his agent wants can be different things. I would have told you a year ago, that Smith just wanted to stay with a team and wouldn’t ask for an unreasonable sum of money, it doesn’t look to be shaking out that way.

        • A1 Yola

          At 31, who will pay Him anything crazy? You know age has to come up in talks about money.

          • John Moore

            30-35 are prime years for a QB. And Smith is low mileage. Age is no concern whatsoever. The guy seems to get a little better every year. The next 5 years for him ought to be his best years.

          • mnelson52

            I think you are right about the prime years, but I also think if he doesn’t sign a reasonable contract, it will be harder for him at age 33 to get a long term deal, which is the age he will be if he plays out his contract this year and gets franchised in 2015. The Chiefs may also think they can have Murray or Bray ready in 2 more years.

      • Kisersosay

        “No one can replace Derrick Johnson! He makes the Pro Bowl Every year” Based on that statement then insert Eric Berry where Johnson is. It is comical to compare Pollard to Berry. Not even in the same ball park in skill sets…..They are barely on the same planet.

        • A1 Yola

          Notice you said Barely instead of Not on the same planet. I didn’t say Berry wasn’t Good, I said He can’t cover a TE and Pollard can.

          • Kisersosay

            Berry had a +12.5 coverage grade (Ranks #3 among Safeties) from PFF. Don’t let his struggles in his early development cloud your judgement. PFF had this to say about Pollard, “In terms of his big-play ability, he gets knocked for his pass coverage”. Before you say anything about the validity of PFF let me say that I take their opinion based on facts over your opinion based on ???????. Just saying….

          • A1 Yola

            The ????? You’re looking for is how Antonio Gates owns him every time they play each other. I know that’s a narrow way to judge but Gates is almost Forty! Why can’t you hold your own with Him? And as far as Pollard, I liked Him when He Was here and thought they should’ve kept him around.
            Maybe I should’ve started My sentence with “I Think”, that way, people wouldn’t think I was trying to state an absolute fact.

          • Kisersosay

            Yea those 3 catches for 21 yards and Zero touchdowns killed us last year. Look I give you that Berry struggled against Gates early in his career. I understand it is your position that he is not good at covering the tight end. Conversely I give Berry credit for him improvement the last couple of years and recognize that he is now very good in coverage. We agree to disagree but I just could not let that Pollard statement go without a challenge. This is after all the internet…..

          • mnelson52

            We released Pollard because his skill set was average. We kept Berry and he’s made the Pro Bowl every year except the year he tore his ACL. I see no comparisons, but that’s just my opinion.

          • berttheclock

            I believe Pollard was released, not because of any problems with his skill set, which were somewhat underdeveloped at the time, but, because he wouldn’t put put up with the Haley method of trying to increase productivity. The biggest mistake made by Pioli was in not gaining draft picks for him. He, immediately, went to the Texans and became a plug and play guy. Pioli let Haley’s ego over ride good business sense.

          • area

            I agree with your assessment of Berry/Pollard and PFF has it’s uses..but it seems they term and group most of their categories and stats for fantasy football irregardless of a players direct role in a certain scheme. The ranking(s) PFF gives of any certain player versus his peer is oftentimes baffling.

      • ladner morse

        Hate to burst the proverbial bubble but…. DJ made the Pro Bowl for the first time just two years ago. This is his third time going.

        • A1 Yola

          2011,2012,2013 via Google search. I wasn’t being literal.

        • John Moore

          Three years in a row IS pretty much every year.

    • A1 Yola

      Pollard could replace Berry. He’d be able to cover the TE better than Berry can.

      • area

        which Pollard?

        • A1 Yola

          Bernard.

          • area

            Bernard is a crack-back that relied heavily on Ed Reed covering for him. Bernard Pollard was released from the Chiefs, purportedly, for too many penalties, lack of closing speed, and an extreme inability to cover. When the rules changed to start favoring the receiver Pollard became a living dinosaur, as many others did.

    • Josh Rose

      I think we should sign Berry, Poe, DJ, and Charles in that order. I think the OL picks we got this year will be better than Allen and Stephenson. We should be able to sign Cooper to a fair but low price and get a young guy to replace Sean Smith

      • Hawthorne

        I would say Poe, Charles, Berry DJ. You may never see another NT like Poe. Charles IS our offense, Berry is amazing, but our defense could get by with a more average SS. DJ is the man and would go at the front of the list if he weren’t so old.

    • ladner morse

      ProFootballTalk says the Cap could reach 160M in 2016 so it changes the way extended contracts are written even now. Remember DJ is older than Hali and came in the year before he did. Plus, DJ will be 34 in 2016 and may not want to play beyond that. I beleive I heard him say last offseason that he’s taking it year to year now. So, before the 2016 season begins he’ll have 11 years experience in. If the Chiefs either, A) regress or, B) make it to the Super Bowl or Conference Championship…. my prediction is he hangs it up by then. Especially if there are any big or nagging injuries to speak of.

      The Chiefs will easily move on from Sean Smith. However, Berry is another issue all together. Players like Berry who are not only top of the line compared to others in the league and high profile… he’s a very popular player and not just in K.C…. these types of players usually don;t fit into the Ted Thompson/John Dorsey scheme of things. Unless… that player is the QB. Then their willing to pay them in accord with league standards (see the 100M contract Rodgers got in 2013. Plus, he made the most ever by a QB in a single season, 40M in 2013).

      However, Berry is the equivalent of the QB of the defense and many have traced the rise of Kansas City’s defense to the arrival of Mr. Berry. So, if the 25 year old Berry is inclined to take a bartered amount and Dorsey is inclined to stretch his limits… we may get to see Eric Berry in K.C the rest of his career. Which, I’m in favor of.

      • John Moore

        Berry is overrated. He could not cover a tight end last year, one on one, period. He is a candidate to be gone after next year. At any rate, he is a liability in coverage. He reminds me of Roy Williams, safety of the Cowboys. Several times all pro, then cut by the Cowboys, because although he was a physical freak, and made highlight plays……………… HE COULD NOT COVER TIGHT ENDS ON PASSING DOWNS. This is Berry’s downfall as well. We are paying him a a lot of money. I think he will be gone sooner than you think.

        • Kisersosay

          I am not sure which games you watched. Berry was actually very good in coverage last year. Had a +12.5 grade for coverage from PFF. Now early on in his career your statement would be more accurate. But last year not so much…..

  • berttheclock

    One other player not mentioned, but, I would like to see how he shows up for training camp is Joe McKnight. His problems at USC and the Jets only happened when he showed up out of shape. In shape, he could be a great addition as a sub RB and a returner. Reid has said he has been working hard, so, Dorsey had picked up several nuggets.

  • berttheclock

    Hey, Mr Dorsey, another possibility for the Chiefs. Luke Marquadt, a massive OT, six eight, 318 pounds has just signed an injury settlement with the Niners. He broke his foot last season. He had been an UDFA who signed for 4 years with the Niners. He has said he will probably resign with them, but, he is available. BTW, he played college ball at Azusa Pacific, the same school for both Christian Okoye and Jackie Slater, the HOFer.

    • ladner morse

      You forgot Laddie Morse.

      Once upon a time… Azusa Pacific was so long ago.

      • berttheclock

        Years ago in the radio days, the “Jack Benny Show” had a running gag. Whenever, Jack went to the downtown LA train station to head east, an announcer would say “Now, boarding on track five for Anaheim, Azusa and CUC……A……Monga”.

      • Calchiefsfan

        Did you happen to play football there?

  • area

    I just don’t believe that Big Fish will be ready by the start of the season, let alone training camp, to compete for starter at LT. He was hobbled last year for the majority of the season and has missed extensive weight training, conditioning, and other assorted field activities that other players are benefiting from. Fisher was already light to begin with and needed a full off season of fattening up and weight training(specifically upper body) so he could compete this year, he did not get any of that. Maybe the fattening up since he could not work out as needed.

    Stephenson, on the other hand, has proven himself a very viable stop-gap, if not a starter, wherever the HC has decided to place him. He’s appears to be a fast learner as he has proved many times by normally excelling, not just filling in, in those positions when he is participating, be it a practice or a game.
    Great big leap here because I’m getting tired of typing and gotta go- I think we’ll see a much improved Stephenson (not that he was ever bad but because he put in the work this last off season) at LT and we’ll see Fulton a lot sooner than anyone expects.

    • ladner morse

      I do believe that the Chiefs will pick up a good OL later this summer but I also think the group they have to work with right now is much better than anyone thought they would be. So, many choices… all of them positive.

      • area

        I am in agreeance, it’s beautiful to see honest to goodness open competition at so many positions.This turnaround is happening faster than I thought it would..but there are many big decisions left to be made by the f.o. Just nice to see the Chiefs be observed for who THEY might cut and not the Chiefs hoping to steal someone else’s leftovers.

  • freshmeat62

    I’ve said before that I love the way D&R are building this team. As you’ve stated there are a lot of questions w/ this team this year. If they can go 3-3 thru their 1st 6 games, and baring any injuries to Smith or Charles, this could be one hell of a foundation to build off of.

    As the season progressed last year, the other teams found the holes in the Chiefs, and exploited them, especially w/ the defense. D&R have addressed those areas, FS, more CB’s (very fast CB’s I might add), and a rush LB. I’m not going to say there are 5 HOF’ers on this D like the SB team, but I think this D has the potential to be the best the Chiefs have ever had. And everybody knows, that’s what wins championships.

    I know Denver has signed a lot of ‘names’ this year, but most of those ‘names’ have injury histories tagging along. And was Manning in the SB just a one game aberration, or has age and injuries finally caught up to him.

    I can see the Chiefs going anywhere from 7-9 to 12-4 this year, so I’ll split the diff and say 10-6 this year.

    • mnelson52

      The last two years, I haven’t seen where injury or age has hurt Manning. He just lead the best offense in the history of the NFL to the SB.

  • freshmeat62

    I don’t know if the Chiefs make the playoffs this year, I think they’re a bubble team. But if they do make it, I suspect they’re going to be THAT team that no one wants to meet in the playoffs.

    • ladner morse

      Confidence. Now, I have the confidence that if a someone goes down, the next guy will step in and step up so, I can see the Chiefs advancing a long way in the playoffs… like the Packers following the 2010 season.

      • mnelson52

        If I remember correctly, Green Bay had 13 starters out when they won the SB

        • berttheclock

          Yes, but, he did appear to age rapidly on February 2, 2014, when, at times he reminded me of the words from a John Denver song, “Lost and alone on some forgotten highway”.

          This was supposed to be a response to mnelson52′s comment below. I put it in the wrong slot.

        • berttheclock

          One RB, 4 LBs, 1 OT, 2 safeties, 1 CB, 2 TEs and 2 DLs. Plus, Rodgers had suffered a concussion and missed a game and Frank Zombo was able to play due to the injuries to the LBS, but, suffered a sprained knee.

          • mnelson52

            That’s unbelievable depth to have that many out and still win the SB

        • ladner morse

          I didn’t realize it was that many. Wow!

    • Ben Nielsen

      Agreed. Very much agreed.

  • Stan Colbert

    I remember reading back in the day where Gene Upshaw was drafted to block Buck Buchanan. Last year all the talk was how Dorsey consciously or not built the team to compete with Denver. I like how we seem to be getting talent no one has heard of, I like it!!!!

    • berttheclock

      Yes, one of the theories of Al Davis is you had to build your team to win your division.

      • mnelson52

        I believe we are working in the right direction to beat Denver. Hawks had a good pass rush that didn’t allow Manning time to throw the long ball. Like every other defense, they didn’t stop Manning from his short quick passes. What they did do though, was hit them hard and not allow the YAC. It look to me, by the end of the game, that Denver’s receivers didn’t even want to catch the ball for fear of being hit hard again. I believe since Denver passes about 90% of the time, that we would need all three pass rushers to play about 90% of the time. To be out there that much means our offense would need to move the ball well for them to get rest during the game. I know we have some fast DBs now so a lot will depend on how well they tackle to stop the yards after the catch. If our DB’s tackle well, I believe we beat Denver. This is just my opinion on the key to us beating Denver. I would like to hear someone else’s version on how to beat Denver. With our schedule, I think this to be true in a few of our games.

        • ladner morse

          Denver opens with Indy, K.C, & Seattle. I’m hoping for 0-3 for them.
          How sweet that would be.

      • Stan Colbert

        Just think it would be great to hear people saying, how we going to compete with KC, again. This season could be quite a comming out party for Chiefs with our schedule!

        • ladner morse

          Absolutely. In the first six game, the pats and the 9ers are the only two games I’m concerned about in terms of match-ups. Otherwise, I think the Chiefs can not only beat every other team… including the Donkeys.. but, blow them away.

          • Stan Colbert

            The NFL has a way of tampering enthusiasm. It is hard to get blowouts in the league. I still have concerns about our lines both O & D. What I am actually excited for is the preseaso! I think we shall discover just how much talent is in the cupboard, possibly drives for scores by third stringers!

          • sidibeke

            In past seasons I’ve been clamoring to see the #1s to see if they could hang. This year, I’m not so worried about that and want to see the 2s and 3s. I’m looking to see if Bray and Murray can do anything.

          • Stan Colbert

            Indeed! I would love them to have such good preseasons other teams are calling about trades!

  • jimfromkcj

    first Laddie, I have been reading these same glowing reports from Chief’s fans for a lot of years, and the results never come close to reality. It hasn’t been so long ago that everyone was singing the praises of Asamoah and then all of a sudden he got so bad that even the true blue believers couldn’t cover his sub par play. If we have Allen, Hudson and another pug ugly in the middle of our off line, and two tackles, any two we have on the roster, we are in for a very long season. As for the CB you were touting, he was on one of my mocks, and was drafted by the one and only Al Davis.

    • ladner morse

      While I was never a fan of Al Davis public persona, he made some good decisions over the years and perhaps valued speed too much over actual football skill but in this case… this guy, Van Dyke, looks like he could be a keeper. We’ll see.

  • John Moore

    Nice article. Somewhat optimistic, as usual, but very illuminating. I’m encouraged about the o-line. But one thing I have to take issue with. Strong owner. Strong owner? Are you high? Clark Hunt has been one of the very worst owners in the NFL. That idiot kept us 30 million dolars under the cap year after year after year during the Pioli years. He is a stinking tightwad. FINALLY he made a good hire in Reid. But how much credit do you want to give him? What choice did he have? Fans were about to burn Arrowhead to the ground, and his name was a dirty word in this town. He is still a very poor excuse for an NFL team owner. Let us all hope he will at very least stay out of Reid and Dorsey’s way.

  • thabear04

    Fisher need to MTFU