Being John Dorsey

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Round 6: Gabe Ikard (C/G), Oklahoma

Ikard

The Chiefs don’t have a seventh-round selection so barring a trade down scenario, the Chiefs’ two R6 picks are the end of the line. To this point in the draft, I believe I’ve addressed Kansas City’s biggest needs and put a quality option, at outside linebacker, in the cupboard for the future (Trent Murphy). The last two picks were heavy investments into players with upside, but those D-II prospects may need time to develop and adjust to elite-level competition. Real-world John Dorsey is known for his ability to identify talent in the later rounds. I should probably make the final two draft choices count.

The board has given me several options to consider at 193. Of those choices, I’m most intrigued by defensive end Josh Mauro, center Gabe Ikard, and cornerback Deion Belue. There are things I like about Belue, but he’s smallish and didn’t make many plays on the ball at Alabama. This is essentially a two-horse race between Mauro and Ikard. Each of them would serve a specific purpose here in Kansas City as valuable depth.

I must admit that I’m fascinated with Mauro as a pure prospect. His size, length, and tenacity make him an interesting development project for defensive line coach Tommy Brasher. Mauro’s already a big guy, but he has a frame that will allow for additional bulk. An NFL weight program will aid him in becoming even more effective as a run stuffer. Trouble is, he may not have the kind of pass rushing skillset you want from a five-technique in the 3-4.

I’m going to give the edge here to Sooner center Gabe Ikard. The four-year starter out of Oklahoma is limited athletically, but tends to make up for it with technique, effort, and football IQ. He also offers line versatility having spent time at guard during his college tenure. Ikard was a Dave Rimington Award finalist alongside five other of the nation’s top centers. He’s a very smart, high-character football player that would fit in well with a young group of budding offensive linemen in Kansas City.

With the 193rd pick in the 2014 NFL Draft, the Kansas City Chiefs select…
Gabe Ikard, Center – Oklahoma

Round 6: Joe Don Duncan (TE), Dixie State

Duncan

The board has held strong throughout the sixth-round. I’ve reached my final pick of the 2014 NFL Draft and the best players available at 200 are tight end Joe Don Duncan, defensive end Ed Stinson, and offensive tackle Cornelius Lucas. This is where you’d normally take a flyer on a raw talent with a high ceiling, and I think each of those three players can be characterized that way.

As much as I think the Chiefs can stand more bodies along the offensive and defensive lines, I’m tempted to complete the hat trick with a third Division II draftee. Duncan’s another player who took advantage of inferior D-II talent at Dixie State. His senior season, he caught an eye-popping 71 passes. Add that to a 1,000-yard campaign and 13 scores and it becomes clear why I think he’d be a good fit for Alex Smith.

In pads you won’t confuse him for Travis Kelce. He’s simply not that kind of athlete. For the sake of comparison, Kelce’s best 40 times hovered around the low-4.5′s while Duncan’s best have been in the high-4.6 range. There are also injury concerns to consider. He’s had multiple right leg injuries that have required surgery and caused him to miss time. If he can stay on the field, he’ll be a hard-working, blue-collar tight end with sticky hands and the ability to run after the catch. If not, he’s a late-rounder who costs you very little.

With the 200th pick in the 2014 NFL Draft, the Kansas City Chiefs select…
Joe Don Duncan, Tight End – Dixie State

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I’d love to know what you think of my draft haul. Did I make good use of Kansas City’s six picks or should I be banned from the virtual Arrowhead facilities? Which picks do you love? Which picks do you hate? Use the comment section below to begin the discussion. You can also take your own spin on the draft simulator and post the players you chose. As always, we appreciate your readership and support!

Until next time, Addicts!

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