Michael Hickey-US PRESSWIRE

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If Jamaal Charles is healthy, his presence in the running game is a major strength for the Chiefs’ offense. Over the course of his four-year career, Charles has averaged a stunning 6.1 yards a carry, a number no running back in NFL history has achieved. Of course, Charles has carried the ball only 499 times in four seasons, thanks to last year’s injury and former coach Todd Haley’s underuse of Charles when he was healthy. If Charles can keep running the way he did before that ACL injury, and if Peyton Hillis can be effective when splitting carries with Charles, they should be strong in the running game. (It’s easy to forget after both players’ disappointing 2011 seasons that Hillis and Charles were two of the best running backs in the NFL in 2010.)

It is with the YMCA of Greater Rochester that Albert works when he shares his messages of motivation and the importance of good health.

“Especially just being active,” the 6-foot-5, 316-pound Albert said.

Albert spent part of Saturday morning at the YMCA Child Care Center at Lewis Street in the city of Rochester. There he shared with 60 8- to 15-year-olds his new “SURVIVE with Branden Albert” program that emphasizes excercise and fitness.

So far, only nine of the league’s 21 franchise players have signed long-term deals. Saints quarterback Drew Brees kicked off the weekend, inking a spectacular five-year extension on Friday that includes a reported $40 million guaranteed in 2012.

Raiders safety Tyvon Branch is the most recent, inking a reported four-year deal worth $17.6 million in guaranteed money on Saturday morning. He had previously signed his one-year franchise tender worth $6.212 million in 2012.

The deadline to sign franchised players to long-term extensions is Monday at 3:00 PM (CST). After that, a multi-year deal can’t be revisited until after the regular season. If a new deal isn’t done by July 16th, attention in Kansas City will turn to Bowe signing a one-year franchise tender valued at $9.5 million.

Charlie Weis might be right in thinking that he could have made Brady Quinn a success. But it’s just as possible (in fact, likely more possible) that he’s become more of a Bobby Petrino type (we mean in the on-field sense only), or one of many spread-offense coaches who are able to engineer hyper-productive offenses that benefit quarterbacks to an overinflated degree. And to the concept of “overinflated,” we might encourage Mr. Weis to exude a bit less hot air. Tom Brady was a miracle for a lot of people, and a lot of people built their reputations on his development. Far more often, you are stuck with a Brady Quinn or Jimmy Clausen, and you have to realize that in an NFL sense, it’s time to go back to the drawing board.

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